Riverfire 2016

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Listen to a preview of the River Listening South Bank sound walk for Riverfire 2016 

Griffith University will bring its own form of colour and energy to the Riverfire weekend, as the curtain comes down on the 2016 Brisbane Festival.

A series of digital installations will celebrate the senses during the weekend and after. ‘Heart and Breath’ will light up the walls of the Art Gallery and Webb Centre at South Bank on Saturday night, while imagined sounds from the world beneath the Brisbane River will be accessible through the River Listening augmented reality sound installation.

The installations are hosted by Griffith University Red Zone,  which provides exciting interactive learning experiences through hands-on technology and exploring innovative research in science, health, business and the arts.

River Listening is an augmented reality sound installation reimagining the world beneath the Brisbane River in sound. The installation can be experienced by walking along the river with a mobile device and triggering geo-located soundscapes throughout South Bank. These geo-located sounds are layered with hydrophone (underwater) recordings and creative responses to the Brisbane River that connect to the soundscapes of river systems across the world.

This installation is part of an interdisciplinary project exploring the art and science of listening to rivers and the creative possibilities of aquatic bioacoustics. River Listening explores rivers as the lifeblood of communities and the potential for new approaches in the conservation of global river systems.

To experience River Listening download the free app Recho and your phone will act as a sonic compass guiding you throughout South Bank. New sounds will be added and adapted throughout Riverfire meaning every person will have a different listening experience.

Use the hashtags #RiverListening, #griffithredzone and #beremarkable on social media to share your experiences.

2016 Art Music Awards

Leah Barclay’s WIRA River Listening from Floating Land 2015 Nominated for the 2016 APRA Art Music Awards 

(Article published in the Noosa News on 26/07/2016)

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The finalists for the 2016 Art Music Awards have been announced. The yearly Art Music Awards are presented by the Australasian Performing Right Association (APRA) and the Australian Music Centre to recognise achievement in the composition, performance, education and presentation of Australian music. From jazz compositions and large-scale symphonic pieces to vocal, chamber and instrumental works and experimental projects, the list of finalists in 11 Award categories reflects the diversity and the high quality of contemporary art music written, composed and performed in 2015.

Leah Barclay’s WIRA River Listening project created on the Noosa River for Floating Land 2015 has been nominated for the Award for Excellence in Experimental Music. This project explored rivers as the lifeblood of communities and reimagined the world beneath the surface of the Noosa River. This project draws on ten years of experimental music collaborations with river systems across the world that all began in Noosa and was the first major creative outcome from Leah Barclay’s Synapse Residency supported by the Australian Network for Art and Technology

WIRA was experienced by walking along the river with a smart phone and listening to content that was geotagged from Noosa Regional Gallery to the river mouth. As you walk along the riverbank, the sounds of the Noosa River system are layered with Leah Barclay’s compositions inspired by Noosa over the last decade.

The soundscapes of WIRA explored the value of sound and technology in contributing towards environmental awareness and engagement. The process of creating this installation explored a new model for the dissemination of experimental music through accessible mobile applications and community engagement. Since launching in Noosa, the River Listening installation has toured to New York for Climate Week 2015, Federation Square in Melbourne, the inaugural World Science Festival in Australia and Paris for COP21, considered the most important climate meeting of our time. The installation continues to expand across the world yet remains connected to Noosa. 

‘In late 2004, I composed my first piece inspired by the Noosa River. This was the beginning of a decade of creative work that explores the value of sound, digital technology and community engagement in environmental awareness. I have been fortunate to work with rivers across the globe and my artist practice has been very influenced by my involvement in Floating Land and working in Noosa. While many consider the mobile technologies I am using in WIRA key factors in our disconnection to the environment, my current work explores the possibilities for repurposing these technologies to reconnect us to the environment and facilitate collaborations that showcase ecological systems through accessible creative technology. WIRA allows you to hear sounds you wouldn’t usually think about and the project is part of a large initiative exploring the art and science of listening to rivers’ said Leah. 

‘The people included in these lists, and indeed across all the nominations lodged, represent our champions, and those who champion our champions. The names of those established and emerging, in cities and in regional areas, show that we have much to celebrate in the Australian art music sector’, said the AMC’s CEO John Davis.

The 2016 Art Music Awards will be presented at the Plaza Ballroom in Melbourne on Tuesday 16 August, hosted by Jonathan Biggins and with a live performance program curated by Gabriella Smart.

APRA AMCOS and the AMC would like to extend congratulations to all of the finalists for the 2016 Art Music Awards – the only event of its kind in Australia to recognise the works that are brought to life by dedicated musicians, individuals, educators and arts organisations all over the country.

2016 Art Meets Science Exhibition, Brisbane

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The Science Division, Department of Science, Information Technology and Innovation (DSITI) is one of multiple science agencies co-located in the Ecosciences Precinct in Brisbane, Queensland. This world class facility houses research and associated staff from the Queensland Government, CSIRO and University of Queensland.

The DSITI 2016 Art meets Science exhibition opens on August 8th and features works by artists working at the intersection of art and science. The show features works by Alinta Krauth, Kay Lawrence, Jeanette Stok and Donna Davis, who have participated in the 2016 Artist in Residence Science Program. These artist have worked for the past three months with scientists from the Department of Science, Information Technology and Innovation at the Ecosciences Precinct and the Queensland Herbarium. These artists will be joined by 12 other Queensland artists with recent artworks that demonstrate an art-science connection.

The exhibition features a preview of the River Listening augmented reality installation with hydrophone recordings and soundscapes planted through the Ecosciences Precinct.

River Listening is an augmented reality sound installation reimagining the world beneath the Brisbane River in sound. The installation can be experienced by walking throughout the Ecosciences Precinct  with a mobile device and listening to geo-located sounds. These geo-located soundscapes are layered with hydrophone (underwater) recordings and creative responses to the Brisbane River. This installation is part of our interdisciplinary project exploring the art and science of listening to rivers across the world. River Listening explores rivers as the lifeblood of communities and underscores the value of listening in our current state of ecological uncertainty.

To experience River Listening download the free app Recho and your phone will act as a compass guiding you on a sonic exploration. Follow the hashtag #RiverListening on twitter for live updates on site and tweet @LeahBarclay if you have any questions.

Further information available here

 

Environmental Sound Artists, Oxford University Press

Leah Barclay’s chapter on River Listening has just been published in ‘Environmental Sound Artists: In Their Own Words’ a new book published by Oxford University Press.

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Environmental Sound Artists: In Their Own Words is an incisive and imaginative look at the international environmental sound art movement, which emerged in the late 1960s. The term environmental sound art is generally applied to the work of sound artists who incorporate processes in which the artist actively engages with the environment. While the field of environmental sound art is diverse and includes a variety of approaches, the art form diverges from traditional contemporary music by the conscious and strategic integration of environmental impulses and natural processes.

This book presents a current perspective on the environmental sound art movement through a collection of personal writings by important environmental sound artists. Dismayed by the limitations and gradual breakdown of contemporary compositional strategies, environmental sound artists have sought alternate venues, genres, technologies, and delivery methods for their creative expression. Environmental sound art is especially relevant because it addresses political, social, economic, scientific, and aesthetic issues. As a result, it has attracted the participation of artists internationally. Awareness and concern for the environment has connected and unified artists across the globe and has achieved a solidarity and clarity of purpose that is singularly unique and optimistic. The environmental sound art movement is borderless and thriving.

“Environmental Sound Artists: In Their Own Words is an extraordinary collection of self-descriptions of wonderfully alive and often iconoclastic work being done by ESAs today. Extremely well organized, edited, and exampled by Frederick Bianchi and VJ Manzo, it will amaze, confound, entertain, and, most importantly inform those with open minds on the present and future of art made in the free world. Unencumbered by strict labels of their work, these artists breathe air into oftentimes stagnant and commercial versions and views of art as described and prescribed by constraints arbitrarily defined centuries ago. I can’t recommend it more enthusiastically.” – David Cope

Edited by Frederick Bianchi, Professor of Humanities and Arts, Worcester Polytechnic Institute, and Edited by V. J. Manzo, Assistant Professor of Music Technology and Perception, Worcester Polytechnic Institute.

Frederick Bianchi is a composer and music technologist. Recognized internationally for his musical compositions, installations, and innovative music technology development, Bianchi has been associated with interactive music applications since the mid-1980s.

V.J. Manzo is Assistant Professor of Music Technology and Cognition at Worcester Polytechnic Institute. He is the author of the books MAX/MSP/Jitter for Music, Foundations of Music Technology, and co-author of Interactive Composition, all published by Oxford University Press.

Contributors:
Andrea Polli
Philip Blackburn
Bernie Krause
David Dunn
John Bullitt
John Luther Adams
Cheryl E. Leonard
Jeff Talman
Leah Barclay
Craig Colorusso
Joseph Bertolozzi
Marty Quinn
Bruce Odland
Ximena Alarcón
Zimoun
China Blue
David Rothenberg
Gordon Hempton
Dawn Scarfe
David Monacchi
Christopher DeLaurenti
Aki Pasoulas
Matthew Burtner

Conservation Biology Congress 2016

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River Listening is featured at the 2016 Society for Conservation Biology Oceania Congress in a symposium titled “Continuous monitoring of invisible places: bioacoustics in marine and freshwater environments”

DATE: July 6, 2016
TIME: 2:30 pm – 4:00 pm
Brisbane Convention and Entertainment Centre

Monitoring aquatic species in underwater environments – rivers, lakes and oceans – has proven even more difficult than terrestrial surveys of endangered taxa. Traditional methods of aquatic survey techniques bear a) risks to fish health and habitat integrity, b) introduce bias, because it might cause fright responses in key aquatic species and c) standard surveying only produces a snapshot from the time of surveying – which in many cases does not happen more than once a year and d) it can be very expensive, particularly in areas with remote access. Non-invasive passive bioacoustic monitoring can address all four problems. This special session will explore novel techniques in aquatic bioacoustics that can aid conservation managers. Topics will range from holistic ecosystem monitoring (Linke, Gifford) to descriptions of detailed algorithms with which soniferous aquatic taxa can be detected. The symposium will also include talks on the challenges of using acoustical data for monitoring populations and on protocols for monitoring and mitigating impacts of noise. The final talk by Dr Leah Barclay will cover bioacoustics as a tool for engaging with the public. We hope that this first session in freshwater and marine bioacoustics at a continental or worldwide SCB conference will raise awareness and kickstart increased joint efforts by marine and freshwater scientists to establish bioacoustics monitoring as a key survey method.

02:30 Simon Linke Real-time Ecosystem Monitoring in Freshwater Environments using Passive Acoustics

02:40 Toby Gifford Underwater Soundscape Ecology: Holistic Methods in Freshwater Bioacoustics

02:50 Chris Karaconstantis Automatic Detection of a Soniferous Fish Species (Neoarius graeffei) to Facilitate Continuous Monitoring

03:00 Jan-Olaf Meynecke Monitoring cetaceans in nearshore coastal waters using hydrophones

03:10 Angela Recalde-Salas Imperfect detection: estimating detection probabilities of baleen whales using passive acoustics

03:20 Elisa Girola Changes in song characteristics with various sources of noise in humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae)

03:30 M. Montserrat Landero F. Can we generate relevant terrain metrics of the seafloor to model species distribution using a low-cost echo-sounder?

03:40 Leah Barclay River Listening: Raising ecological awareness through community engagement

03:50 Discussion

 

International Society of Ecoacoustics (ISE)

River Listening featured as a sound installation and research presentations at the International Society of Ecoacoustics (ISE) Congress in East Lansing, Michigan in June 2016. Explore the conference proceedings here 

What is ecoacoustics?

Ecoacoustics is an interdisciplinary science that investigates natural and anthropogenic sounds and their relationship with the environment over a wide range of study scales, both spatial and temporal, including populations and communities. Ecoacoustics operates in all types of terrestrial and aquatic (freshwater and marine) ecosystems extending the scope of acoustics and bioacoustics.

Ecoacoustics recognizes that sounds can be both the subject and tools of ecological research. As the subject, sounds are investigated in order to understand their evolution, functions and properties under environmental pressures. As tools, sounds are used to study and monitor animal diversity, abundance, behaviour, dynamics and distribution, and their relationship with ecosystems and the environment.

World Science Festival

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The World Science Festival began in New York in 2008 and is an annual weeklong celebration and exploration of science. The inaugural World Science Festival Brisbane will bring some of the world’s greatest thought leaders to Queensland, showcase local scientists and performers from around the Asia Pacific region, and host the brightest and the best from previous events in New York.

The inaugural World Science Festival Brisbane will take place between 9 and 13 March 2016 and is presented by the Queensland Museum. River Listening is thrilled to be a featured part of the program with our popular River Listening Augmented Reality Sound Installation for the duration of the festival. We are also pleased to present a number of activities on March 12th including a live performance, presentation and series of our signature sound walks (see the program below).

RIVER LISTENING INSTALLATION

River Listening is an augmented reality sound installation reimagining the world beneath the Brisbane River in sound. The installation can be experienced by walking along the river with a mobile device and listening to content that is geo-located along the river. These geo-located soundscapes are layered with hydrophone (underwater) recordings and creative responses to the Brisbane River. This installation is part of our interdisciplinary project exploring the art and science of listening to rivers across the world. River Listening explores rivers as the lifeblood of communities and underscores the value of listening in our current state of ecological uncertainty.

To experience River Listening download the free app Recho and your phone will act as a compass guiding you on a sonic exploration along the Brisbane River. The soundscapes will evolve with new material added every day during WSF. Follow the hashtag #RiverListening on twitter for live updates on site and tweet @LeahBarclay if you have any questions. River Listening launches on March 9th and continues until March 13th.

RIVER LISTENING PROGRAM

Date: Saturday 12th March
Cultural Forecourt, Melbourne Street, South Brisbane, Queensland, Australia

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STREET SCIENCE, RIVER LISTENING LAB

10am – 4pm, Booth 21 (near the Festival Lab)

Come and meet the River Listening team (Dr. Simon Linke, Dr. Leah Barclay and Dr. Toby Gifford), learn about the art and science of listening to rivers, experiment with a hydrophone (underwater microphone), learn more about our sound installation and experience hands-on demonstrations of our aquatic bioacoustics technology.

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RIVER LISTENING – Afternoon tour

15:30 – 16:30, Festival Lab

Meeting point details: The River Listening Walking Tour departs the River Listening tent (located next to the Festival Lab venue) at 3:30pm on Saturday, March 12.

River Listening is an interdisciplinary project exploring the art and science of listening to rivers across the world. Join the River Listening team on a 60-minute guided sound walk along the Brisbane River to learn about the project and explore aquatic soundscapes geo-located throughout the Southbank Parklands. To experience the River Listening installation you will need a mobile device and headphones to use the free app Recho. Participants will also have the opportunity to listen to a live hydrophone in the Brisbane river. Please download the free app Recho before the walk.

Leah Barclay

RIVER LISTENING LIVE

5:30pm-6:30pm, Festival Lab

River Listening is an interdisciplinary research project that explores the creative possibilities of aquatic bioacoustics and the potential for new approaches in the conservation of global river systems. The project inspires community engagement through interactive listening labs, sound maps, immersive performances and augmented reality sound installations that have travelled the world. River Listening combines digital technologies, science and creativity to connect communities and inspire environmental engagement. Join internationally renowned artists and scientists Dr. Leah Barclay, Dr. Simon Linke and Dr. Toby Gifford to learn about the project and hear an exclusive live performance for World Science Festival.

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RIVER LISTENING – Night tour

18:45 – 19:45, Festival Lab

Meeting point details: The River Listening Walking Tour departs the River Listening tent (located next to the Festival Lab venue) at 6:45pm on Saturday 12 March.

River Listening is an interdisciplinary project exploring the art and science of listening to rivers across the world. Join the River Listening team on a 60-minute guided sound walk along the Brisbane River to learn about the project and explore aquatic soundscapes geo-located throughout the Southbank Parklands. To experience the River Listening installation you will need a mobile device and headphones to use the free app Recho. Participants will also have the opportunity to listen to a live hydrophone in the Brisbane river. Please download the free app Recho before the walk.

 
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Dr. Simon Linke is a Senior Research Fellow at the Australian Rivers Institute, Griffith University. Dr. Leah Barclay and Dr. Toby Gifford are Research Fellows at the Queensland Conservatorium, Griffith Univeristy. We acknowledge the support of Griffith University in this project.

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International Bioacoustics Congress

The XXV International Bioacoustics Congress was held in Murnau, Germany from 7th-12th September 2015, with a packed programme of papers, keynotes, posters and events. The River Listening team presented two posters on the project, which are also featuring during the River Listening Lab at the 2016 World Science Festival in Brisbane, Australia. 

(click the image to open a larger version) 

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Pause Fest 2016, Australia

Melbourne’s first River Listening experience explored the Yarra River and launched during Pause Fest 2016. The augmented reality installation can be experienced by walking along the Yarra River with a mobile device and listening to content that is geotagged along the river bank. As you walk along the path, the sounds of the river system are layered with sonic art and river stories for Pause delegates to discover between sessions. In addition to the Yarra soundscapes, this experience stretched through Federation Square with a sound map connecting river systems across the world.

Leah Barclay

Leah Barclay

Leah Barclay

Leah Barclay Toby Gifford   Leah Barclay

Leah Barclay

YARRA RIVER LISTENING

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Yarra River Terrace & Federation Square, Melbourne

Monday 8th – Sunday 14th Feburary // 9:00am – 11:00pm

River Listening is launching in Melbourne, Australia during Pause Fest 2016, a catalyst for innovation, a uniter of industries and a platform for the future. Six years ago, Pause’s founder George Hedon saw an opportunity to start bringing together a new breed of thinkers and Pause Fest is now established as a major international event for those working at the intersection of creativity, technology and innovation.

Melbourne’s first River Listening installation explores the Yarra River. The installation can be experienced by walking along the Yarra River with a mobile device and listening to content that is geotagged along the river bank.

As you walk along the path, the sounds of river system are layered with sonic art and river stories for Pause delegates to discover between sessions. In addition to the Yarra soundscapes, this experience will stretch through Federation Square with a sound map connecting to other river systems across the world.

Listeners will hear Amazon river dolphins as they walk down the steps and pilgrims chanting on the banks of India’s Narmada River as they look towards the sky. These sonic discoveries will explore the value of sound and technology in contributing towards environmental awareness and engagement.

As the recent documentary Racing Extinction highlights: if we can bring the sights and sounds of the natural world to humans who would otherwise never think about them, they might be motivated and inspired to alter their habits enough to take action and respond to the ramifications of climate change.

To experience YARRA – RIVER LISTENING, Pause Fest delegates will download the free app Recho for this exclusive Pause Fest experience.

The soundscapes will evolve with new sounds added everyday during Pause Fest. Follow @LeahBarclay on twitter for live updates onsite and join our daily demo sessions and sound walks by using the #RiverListening hashtag on twitter.

River Listening Augmented Reality Sound Installation – Leah Barclay

Step 1. Download the free app Recho to your mobile device and connect your headphones.
Step 2. Walk towards the first sound, your phone will act as a compass and guide you through YARRA RIVER LISTENING
Step 4. When you approach the first sound it will play automatically, tap the sound once to open it.
Step 5. Wait for 3-5 seconds (to load) and stop to listen to the soundscape.

Leah Barclay
Leah Barclay – River Listening in Paris – COP21, December 2015